Restoration & Renovation

Clear communication between owner, contractor, and architect is critical to a successful home design project. Agreement on some simple definitions is a good place to start.

“Remodeling” is often broadly used to describe any kind of change to an existing house. Technically, it’s more accurate to say that remodel means to change the character of a house or a portion of a house. So when you convert a den into a master bedroom you’re remodeling the den. When you combine a kitchen and dining room into one large eat-in kitchen you’re remodeling the kitchen and dining room (this is an extremely popular type of project in our office right now.)

“Renovating” is a much more specific term. It means, quite literally, to make new again. An out-of-date kitchen, updated with new finishes and fixtures, has been renovated. Replacing old windows with new ones is a renovation project.

“Restoring” a house is sort of the opposite of renovation. Instead of updating, you’re making the house like it was before (i.e., you can do a historic restoration but not a historic renovation.)

Even if you convert existing spaces back to their original use, you’re still restoring the original rooms.
Removing vinyl siding and fixing up the original wood siding and trim is a restoration project.

Confused? Let’s review. Three similar terms, three different meanings. I remember them this way:

  • Remodel: Changing the use of a space or spaces.
  • Renovate: Make a space new without changing its use.
  • Restore: Return a space to its original use, and/or return a space to its original character.

Roofing

Here are just some of the many services our company provides. Don’t see what you are looking for? Call and ask we can handle any roofing related job.
* New Roofs Including:
– asphalt/fiberglass shingle
– dimensional shingles
– concrete/clay tile
– bitumen/torchdown roofing
– wood shingle and shake
– mobile home roofs
– aluminum and other metal roofs
– flat roofs
– specialty roofs – ie: brass, green roofing
* Roof Repair
– temporary
– permanent
* Leak Repair
* Historical Roofs
* Maintenance Programs
* HOA & Property Management
* Roof Tune Ups
* Tear-Offs
* Roof and Gutter Cleaning
* Escrow Certificates
* Patios
* Deck and Basement Coating
* Windows/Doors
* Solar Tubes
* Power Washing
* Ventilation Systems
* Transitions – Flat to Pitched
* Skylights
* Fascia Replacements


Siding

If you’re thinking of new siding, you’re in for a treat — and a conundrum. Your choice will likely be a major upgrade in your home’s appearance — that’s the fun part. On the flip side, it’s not an easy decision to make. There are lots of siding options, and each presents a mixed bag of cost, reliability, ongoing maintenance and environmental responsibility.

Here’s what you need to know about options for new siding:

Vinyl

Vinyl siding is tough and comes in a boatload of colors and textures. Because the color is throughout the material, nicks and scratches don’t show up. Sophisticated manufacturing techniques create products that do a surprisingly fine job of mimicking wood-grain lap siding, wood shingles and even stone.

Vinyl siding is lightweight and, in many instances, can be installed directly over existing materials, so it’s a good retrofit option. Because it’s easy to handle, vinyl installation can be installed quickly, saving labor costs.

Relatively new to the market, insulated vinyl siding features a layer of expanded polystyrene foam, providing an insulating value of R-2 to R-6. Insulated vinyl is on the checklist of items that can help a house achieve Energy Star qualification. Expect to pay about 15 percent more for insulated versions of vinyl siding than regular.

Wood

Few building materials have the natural charm and beauty of wood clapboard and shingle siding. Prized for its warmth and workability, wood siding is the choice for a premium renovation project.

Wood siding comes in many species and grades. What you choose usually depends on how you plan to finish the siding. Using a clear sealer or semi-transparent stain highlights the grain, but you’ll need to select more expensive grades of wood that are free of knots and other blemishes. Choose less-expensive grades for use with paint or opaque stains.

With dedicated maintenance, wood can last generations. Clear finishes should be reapplied every two years; semi-transparent stains every three years; and paints every five years. That kind of diligence adds up — a complete refinishing job is $2,000 to $5,000.

Fiber Cement

The current darling of the siding industry, fiber cement has earned a reputation for stability and low maintenance. It’s made from a mix of wood pulp, cement, clay and sand, and it can be molded to mimic wood clapboard, shingles, stucco and masonry. It readily accepts paint, and most manufacturers offer an array of factory-applied finishes.

Stucco

Stucco is an extremely durable siding material that pairs well with other siding materials and adds a bit of architectural panache to a retrofit job. Today’s stucco mixtures include epoxy, which prevents chipping and cracking, but installation isn’t a DIY job — you’ll need to look for an experienced stucco installer. Well-maintained stucco will last a lifetime.

Engineered Wood Siding

Engineered wood siding is made of wood fibers and exterior-grade resins. It’s tough, strong and can stand up to extreme weather conditions. It comes in a variety of styles and textures, including beaded lap, rough-sawn clapboard and look-alike wood shingles. It comes ready-to-paint, primed or with factory finishes.

Engineered wood siding positions itself as a cheaper alternative to fiber cement and real wood, but with similar durability. Some brands provide 50-year warranties.

Synthetic Stone

Synthetic stone is made in molds from a mixture of cement, sand and aggregate. Modern manufacturing techniques ensure that the final product looks realistic. It mimics any number of stone types — including granite and limestone — and the variety of shapes and styles includes split face, dry stacked and round river rock.

Although it’s not often used to cover entire houses, it’s a popular choice as an accent, covering lower portions of walls or chimney exteriors.


Windows

Knowing when to replace your home’s windows isn’t always as clear as it may seem. If your home is older than 15 years, it’s probably a good time to check and make sure your windows are still operating correctly. For instance, do you have trouble opening or closing your windows? Do you consistently find moisture on your windows’ interior? Just like your washing machine, refrigerator, or roof shingles, over time, your windows and doors need to be replaced. To help you through the replacement process, our company  provides the following tips and solutions to help determine if the time to replace — and upgrade — is now.

  • DO YOUR WINDOWS USE SINGLE-PANE GLASS?
  • DOES IT SEEM ESPECIALLY NOISY IN YOUR HOUSE?
  • ARE YOU SEEING YOUR FURNITURE, CARPET, DRAPES OR ARTWORK FADE AWAY?
  • ARE YOU STILL USING STORM WINDOWS?
  • DO YOUR WINDOWS LEAK WATER OR LET IN TOO MUCH AIR IN THE WINTER OR SUMMER MONTHS?
  • ARE YOUR WINDOWS AS BEAUTIFUL AS YOU WOULD LIKE THEM?
  • ARE YOUR WINDOWS EASY TO USE?
  • DO YOUR WINDOWS CLOSE AND LOCK PROPERLY?
  • ARE YOUR WINDOWS DIFFICULT TO CLEAN?
  • ARE YOUR WINDOWS FALLING APART OR ROTTING?
  • DO YOUR WINDOWS MATCH THE STYLE OF YOUR HOME?
  • ARE YOU TIRED OF PAINTING YOUR WINDOW EXTERIORS, OR IS THE EXTERIOR PAINT PEELING?

Gutters

Your roof and gutters were originally designed to be your home’s water management system, with the sole purpose of moving water away from the house. Uncontrolled water flow can rot wood, damage foundations, cause mildew, and lead to expensive repairs to windows, siding and fascia.

At Bischel Building, we install only the best, most efficient gutter systems. We provide a seamless gutter, which prevent dripping and leakage, constructed from .027 gauge materials, making them sturdy and durable enough to withstand heavy rainfall, ice and snow. Our gutters are also coated with a protective finish that blocks harmful UV rays from discoloration.


Stone & Brick

Generally considered the highest quality choice for home exteriors, brick and stone are also almost maintenance free and will last as long as the house, though some repairs may be needed from time to time.

Advantages

Timeless and refined, a brick or stone exterior is one of the best choices for your home. Either material creates a fire-resistant covering that will increase the value of your home. Research has shown that brick effectively lowers heating and cooling costs by as much as eight percent. It can withstand high winds and is not typically damaged by hail or other debris that may be blown around in windy conditions. Brick and stone exteriors are also extremely durable and can continue protecting your home well into the next century.